Management of Pectus Deformities in Adults


Author

Year


Age

Approach

PD

PR (%)

Compl. (%)

Recur.

FUP (ms)

Mansour et al. [5]

2003

77

22

Open

PE+PC

91

14.3

1

12

Fonkalsrud et al. [9]

2002

116

30

Open

PE+PC

96.5

22

2

51.6

Wurtz et al. [10]

2012

205

25

Open

PE+PC

97.5

8.3

1

24

Fonkalsrud and Mendoza [15]

2006

275

19.8

Opena

PE+PC

98.1

2.9

2

17

Jaroszewski and Fonkalsrud [21]

2007

320

27

Open

PE+PC

98

4.6

6

26

Hebra [20]

2006

30

23

MIRPE

PE

86

29

n/a

n/a

Park et al. [19]

2011

102

19

MIRPE

PE

n/a

20

n/a

n/a

Liu et al. [14]

2012

18

21

MIRPE

Rec.PE

100

50

0

19


Legend: PD pectus deformity, PR positive results, Compl. complications, Recur. recurrence, FUP(ms) follow-up in months, PE pectus excavatum, PC pectus carinatum, Rec.PE recurrent pectus excavatum

aminimally open approach





Complications


A number of complications are reported equally with both techniques: pneumothorax, pleural effusions, pericarditis, bleeding, seroma, skin infection, and persistent chest pain. Bar displacement is a dreadful complication almost exclusive to the minimally invasive approach; its incidence has changed during the years because of the routine use of stabilizers with a reduction from 9.5 to 2.5 % [18, 19]. The incidence of recurrence is different with the minimally invasive and the open approaches: with the former the incidence is low, ranging between 2 and 5 % [1820]; with the open approach it is higher with a large variability (1.3–37 %) [5, 9, 21] probably due to an imprecise subpericondrial resection.

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Dec 30, 2016 | Posted by in CARDIOLOGY | Comments Off on Management of Pectus Deformities in Adults
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